Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse

Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse have worked collaboratively for over sixteen years. Their practice includes painting, printmaking, and large-scale, site-specific sculpture all of which is focused on creating places that bring some joy to others. Their work is included in museums, and many private and public collections.

Mickett came to the collaboration from a background in philosophy, visual art, film, radio, poetry, and theater. Stackhouse followed a traditional visual arts path, and his individual work can be found in museum collections around the world including the Museum of Modern Art, and the National Gallery in Washington, DC, and The National Gallery of Australia. Both hold PhDs: Mickett in philosophy and Stackhouse has an honorary doctorate in art. 

Their most recent work includes Gateway Trio (2015), a privately commissioned ensemble for the lobby of the new Gateway Plaza Building in downtown Richmond, Virginia, which includes a 72 foot long mosaic and a 43 foot long glass and stainless steel walk-through sculpture, Breath of Cyprus Moon (2013), a 8’H x 27’ Diameter installation at the Selby Gallery at the Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, FL, Breath of Water (2012), a 8’H x 38L’ x 18W’ installation, at the Lab Gallery in New York City, On Board (2011), a series of five paintings, located on the USFSP campus and commissioned by the Florida’s Art in State Building Program and Place In The Woods, (2010), a bronze and brass walk-through sculpture, 14’H, 28’L, 14’W, commissioned by the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Benwood Foundation, and the Art in Public Places Project in Chattanooga, TN.

A significant portion of their work explores water both two dimensionally and three dimensionally. Their explorations are not literal representations, but look at water and its ways-of-being metaphorically. Of their installation Breath of Water (Lab Gallery, NYC), Jonathan Goodman wrote in Sculpture Magazine: “It was abstract and did not show water, or its movement in any directly recognizable way, but the idea of water, its ability to change subtly, was beautifully portrayed.” The “idea of water” allows them to explore how structure or environment or an imposed conceptual scheme shapes both us and our world, and how, in these structures, we are nevertheless always in flux – in the constant flow of life. 

In the blog for our Rapid Returns individual artist fellowship, we shall focus on the importance of our assistant Thaddeus Root, on the process of engaging in new projects, and on setting up a new studio. We cannot, of course, predict what adventures life may present, so the blog reader may be taken down an entirely different path: a state of affairs not unheard of in our lives.