August 12 to 18, Grant Related Activities

As anybody who knows me well will tell you, teaching is an important part of my art practice. After obtaining a BFA degree, I went on to get my California Teaching Credentials in Art, K through 12, then a Master's Degree in Art and a Ph.D. in Studio Art and Arts Administration (hoping that the terminal degree would enable me to teach in colleges and universities).

I've taught drawing at Ringling College of Art and Design; sculpture at Hillsborough Community College, Ybor City; Art Appreciation at Barry University in Tampa and, for the past fifteen years or so, I've taught painting in Eckerd College's Program for Experienced Learners and, on occasion, in the College's residential program.  A few times a year I teach mixed media workshops in my studio (as well as, once in a while, at the Morean Arts Center where I've taught painting for over fifteen years) and, recently, I taught a mixed media retreat with Dr. Linn Sennott at Rainbow Rivers Center in Dunnellon, Florida. 

When I'm in India in December, I plan to work with children in New Delhi and incorporate their art in my installation, to be shown at St Petersburg's Studio@620 next year. This will be similar to the way in which I incorporated the drawings of local teens (whom I taught as an artist in residence with Youth Art Corps ) into my installation, Sanctuary at Gallery 221, Hillsborough Community College, Tampa, in 2014.

I'm still scanning slides! I moved on this week, from slides of my own art, to scanning slides of residencies. I was an Artist in Residence with the New Mexico Arts Division and with the Virginia Commission for the Arts, with VSA, New Mexico and Florida--with whom I still do residencies--and, for several years, with Youth Arts Corps in Pinellas County as well as Creative Clay's Creative Care, an arts in healthcare program, at Ronald MacDonald House, All Children's Hospital and St Anthony's Hospital, where I still teach art to patients. Then there were several short-term residencies, such as the one I did with Tampa's Children's Board a few years ago, illustrating  the play, My Children! My Africa! by South African playwright, Athol Fugard, and the one I did last year at Hampshire College, Massachusetts, with students in the environmental studies program as well as art education students. The most recent was on Monday at St Petersburg's Museum of Fine Arts where, for the first time, I taught art to Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers through VSA, Florida. I'm including images here of a few of those hundreds of residencies. Sadly, some of the scanned images are grainy and have faded over time.

Meanwhile I made progress on the second panel of the mixed media diptych I've been working on for the past few weeks and, so far, I'm happy with the way it's turning out. 

I also completed a drainage system in the area between my back deck and my studio which, during heavy rains, became a flood zone. It looks good--hopefully it will accomplish its purpose!    

 Magical Marty, made for a VSA, New Mexico, project. I made three interactive sculptures as part of this residency.

Magical Marty, made for a VSA, New Mexico, project. I made three interactive sculptures as part of this residency.

 Pojoaque High School students with  I'll WIPP You and Waste You Away , an installation as part of  Art Windows on Route 66 , which, in competition with professional artists, won Honorable Mention. It was a protest against the Waste Isolation Pilot Project which was being planned to carry nuclear waste past their school in rural New Mexico to Carlsbad Caverns in Southern New Mexico.  

Pojoaque High School students with I'll WIPP You and Waste You Away, an installation as part of Art Windows on Route 66, which, in competition with professional artists, won Honorable Mention. It was a protest against the Waste Isolation Pilot Project which was being planned to carry nuclear waste past their school in rural New Mexico to Carlsbad Caverns in Southern New Mexico.  

 The Jungle project, made with Special Education students at Pojoaque elementary school.  In a recording session, students made animal sounds to mimic the animal that they had created. The recorded sounds became a part of the final installation, the background was inspired by Matisse's cut-outs.

The Jungle project, made with Special Education students at Pojoaque elementary school.  In a recording session, students made animal sounds to mimic the animal that they had created. The recorded sounds became a part of the final installation, the background was inspired by Matisse's cut-outs.

 The Ice Palace, created with  children and their parents at the Children's Museum in Santa Fe.   

The Ice Palace, created with children and their parents at the Children's Museum in Santa Fe.  

 A batik made by a camper at Buck's Rock Summer Camp where I taught batik-making for a couple of summers in the early '90s. 

A batik made by a camper at Buck's Rock Summer Camp where I taught batik-making for a couple of summers in the early '90s. 

 Preparing for the Earth Day Santa Fe parade, a residency I did with students at Sweeney Elementary School in which they protested the Exxon Valdez oil spill that had recently occurred. The students learned how clowns, minstrels and comedians have been the voice of protest in communities  from the Medieval era until the present day.     

Preparing for the Earth Day Santa Fe parade, a residency I did with students at Sweeney Elementary School in which they protested the Exxon Valdez oil spill that had recently occurred. The students learned how clowns, minstrels and comedians have been the voice of protest in communities from the Medieval era until the present day.    

 Sweeney Elementary students participating in the Earth Day Santa Fe parade with their posters made during the residency.  

Sweeney Elementary students participating in the Earth Day Santa Fe parade with their posters made during the residency.  

 For several summers I worked with a few of my Ringling College students making collaborative installations with youth at recreation centers throughout Pinellas County through Youth Arts Corps. Here the teens and their counselor at Childs Park Recreation Center show off a train made with recycled materials and papier maché. At the end of the summer, after a morning spent "Scrubbin' the Burg" (clearing litter from St Petersburg's streets), the teens came with their completed installations to St Petersburg's Coliseum where the creations, ranging from rocket ships to circus scenes, were judged by members of the City Council.  

For several summers I worked with a few of my Ringling College students making collaborative installations with youth at recreation centers throughout Pinellas County through Youth Arts Corps. Here the teens and their counselor at Childs Park Recreation Center show off a train made with recycled materials and papier maché. At the end of the summer, after a morning spent "Scrubbin' the Burg" (clearing litter from St Petersburg's streets), the teens came with their completed installations to St Petersburg's Coliseum where the creations, ranging from rocket ships to circus scenes, were judged by members of the City Council.  

 An apartment building created by the youth at Wildwood Recreation Center as part of the Youth Arts Corps summer project. 

An apartment building created by the youth at Wildwood Recreation Center as part of the Youth Arts Corps summer project. 

 The Magic Tree created by family members of patients at All Children's Hospital, a collaborative project with dancer and choreographer, Paula Kramer.

The Magic Tree created by family members of patients at All Children's Hospital, a collaborative project with dancer and choreographer, Paula Kramer.

 In the summer of 2012 I returned to New Mexico, where I had lived from 1980 until 1993, and, through a program of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, I worked with teenage girls over the course of a few days, painting flowers with acrylics on canvas "like Georgia O'Keeffe."

In the summer of 2012 I returned to New Mexico, where I had lived from 1980 until 1993, and, through a program of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, I worked with teenage girls over the course of a few days, painting flowers with acrylics on canvas "like Georgia O'Keeffe."

 While living in New Mexico, I collaborated with Lind Piper, an actor, story teller and theater director, on several projects. This is a huge papier maché head, one of several made by students at an elementary school in Farmington, NM. The heads depicted the various stereotypes in the play that the children wrote and acted before an audience of friends and family. The message of the play was: learn to see people as individuals and not as stereotypes based on prejudice.     

While living in New Mexico, I collaborated with Lind Piper, an actor, story teller and theater director, on several projects. This is a huge papier maché head, one of several made by students at an elementary school in Farmington, NM. The heads depicted the various stereotypes in the play that the children wrote and acted before an audience of friends and family. The message of the play was: learn to see people as individuals and not as stereotypes based on prejudice.     

  Linda Piper's and my most successful residency as collaborators was with the Youth Diagnostic and Development Center in Albuquerque, NM, where we worked with incarcerated youth to write and perform a play about the individuals behind the masks we present to the world. The play was called "Hidden Images." My role was to create masks, sets and publicity with the young inmates. A few days before the big day of the show, the sheriff arrived to release our male lead. He begged the sheriff to allow him to stay until after the performance, the sheriff conceded, and the show went on! 

Linda Piper's and my most successful residency as collaborators was with the Youth Diagnostic and Development Center in Albuquerque, NM, where we worked with incarcerated youth to write and perform a play about the individuals behind the masks we present to the world. The play was called "Hidden Images." My role was to create masks, sets and publicity with the young inmates. A few days before the big day of the show, the sheriff arrived to release our male lead. He begged the sheriff to allow him to stay until after the performance, the sheriff conceded, and the show went on! 

 One summer, a few years ago, I worked in tandem with a couple of educators and a writer to address the issue of bullying in our communities. The project was entitled "Speak Up Speak Now!" We worked with the teens in various Pinellas County institutions and my role, as the visual artist, was to make posters with  the teens  using collagraphed self portraits with anti-bullying slogans like "My name is Brianna, I'm an Upstander not a Bystander!" The posters were exhibited at the Florida Holocaust Museum in St Petersburg.     

One summer, a few years ago, I worked in tandem with a couple of educators and a writer to address the issue of bullying in our communities. The project was entitled "Speak Up Speak Now!" We worked with the teens in various Pinellas County institutions and my role, as the visual artist, was to make posters with the teens using collagraphed self portraits with anti-bullying slogans like "My name is Brianna, I'm an Upstander not a Bystander!" The posters were exhibited at the Florida Holocaust Museum in St Petersburg.     

 The "Speak Up Speak Now!" exhibition at the Florida Holocaust Museum 

The "Speak Up Speak Now!" exhibition at the Florida Holocaust Museum 

 I worked, as a member of the Creative Care team, at All Children's Hospital to assist young patients create the illustrations for an alphabet book written by Noelle Schneider.

I worked, as a member of the Creative Care team, at All Children's Hospital to assist young patients create the illustrations for an alphabet book written by Noelle Schneider.

 An illustration, done by an All Children's Hospital patient, for Noelle Schneider's book.

An illustration, done by an All Children's Hospital patient, for Noelle Schneider's book.

  A collaborative project, a  picket fence created by the Youth Arts Corps teens at Skyview Recreation Center in Pinellas Park where I taught art in the after school program for several years.  

A collaborative project, a picket fence created by the Youth Arts Corps teens at Skyview Recreation Center in Pinellas Park where I taught art in the after school program for several years.  

 Ryan W., a student in Creative Clay's Transitions program, working on a sculpture in my studio as part of the Art Link program that teams Creative Clay artists with professional artists.

Ryan W., a student in Creative Clay's Transitions program, working on a sculpture in my studio as part of the Art Link program that teams Creative Clay artists with professional artists.

 The sculptures Ryan W. and I made out of recycled materials and papier maché. These were some of the characters in the book that Ryan wrote as part of our Creative Clay's Art Link project.

The sculptures Ryan W. and I made out of recycled materials and papier maché. These were some of the characters in the book that Ryan wrote as part of our Creative Clay's Art Link project.

 Artwork created by Hampshire College environmental studies students for the "Hampshire Living Tree" project. The paintings of farm animals are seen here drying in the campus farm barn prior to being incorporated into a collaborative collage to be hung in a new state-of-the-arts, environmentally friendly building being erected on campus.

Artwork created by Hampshire College environmental studies students for the "Hampshire Living Tree" project. The paintings of farm animals are seen here drying in the campus farm barn prior to being incorporated into a collaborative collage to be hung in a new state-of-the-arts, environmentally friendly building being erected on campus.

 A detail from the "Hampshire Living Tree" collaborative collage.

A detail from the "Hampshire Living Tree" collaborative collage.

 Some of the participants during the Spring Mixed Media Creativity Retreat at Rainbow Rivers Center in 2016 at an early morning yoga session prior to returning to their cabins to make art.

Some of the participants during the Spring Mixed Media Creativity Retreat at Rainbow Rivers Center in 2016 at an early morning yoga session prior to returning to their cabins to make art.

 Drawing session during our Spring Mixed Media Creativity Retreat at Rainbow Rivers Center, Dunnelon.

Drawing session during our Spring Mixed Media Creativity Retreat at Rainbow Rivers Center, Dunnelon.